Famous Gingers in history

01/03/13 at 9:56 am

Ginger combines with many other spicy flavors nicely though remains distinctly identifiable. It is perhaps due to their standing out amongst others that the redheads are commonly called gingers. Interestingly, the causative gene for the red coloration of hair is also commonly known as the ginger gene, although it has a different technical name. Pheomelanin is the red pigment which changes the dark pigment eumelanin into different shades of red including red, orange red, burnt orange, burgundy, auburn, and bright copper. Ginger is considered an attractive, interesting, and agreeably stimulating flavor. Redheads are similarly very agreeable persons. Both the terms “ginger” as well as “redheads” are considered slightly derogatory, while in many cultures red hair is considered beautiful and treated as complimentary to beauty. Pre-Raphaelite artists were especially attracted towards beautiful red hair and in portraying the red hair they had created notable works of art. The occurrence of red hair in nature in the human population ranges from 1-2 percent. Gingers have fair skin, and their eye colors are blue, green, and hazel. They are sensitive to sunshine and have freckles. Redhead Day is a festival observed on the first weekend of September each year in the Netherlands.

1. Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots was born to James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise on December 8, 1542 in Linlithgow Palace, Scotland. She died on February 8, 1587 in the Fotheringhay Castle. She had a small, oval head with auburn hair, a graceful neck, and fair skin. Her eyes were hazel brown. She was the only child of King James V of Scotland who died when she was only six days old, and she succeeded to the throne. From December 14, 1542 to July 24, 1567, she was the Queen Regent of Scotland. From July 10, 1559 to December 5, 1560 she was the Queen Consort of France. She was kept in custody by Queen Elizabeth, I of England for more than 18 years and found guilty of plotting her death.

2. Robert Roy MacGregor

Robert Roy MacGregor

Robert Roy MacGregor

Robert Roy MacGregor, also known as Red MacGregor, was born to Donald MacGregor and Margaret Campbell at Glengyle, Loch Katrine on March 7, 1671. He had red hair which turned auburn in later life. He was a well-known outlaw of the early 18th century and was considered like Robin Hood by the Scottish folk. He was wounded in the Battle of Glen Shield which aimed at restoring the Stuart monarchy. The Jacobites and Spanish were defeated by the English in this battle. In his later life, Rob Roy became a cattleman and borrowed money from James Graham, first Duke of Montrose. As he did not pay back this money, he was declared an outlaw, and Graham seized his lands. He was imprisoned in 1727 but released later on. He died in his house at Inverlochlarig Beg Balquhidder on December 28, 1734.

3. Janelle Redhead

Janelle Redhead

Janelle Redhead

Janelle Redhead is a well-known Grenadian sprinter who specialized in the 200 meter short running events in athletics as well as in track and field. She was the winner of the bronze medal in the 2008 World Junior Championship. Her best performances are 11.65 seconds in the 100 meters and 22.91 seconds in the 200 meters. As a member of Grenada’s track team, she participated in the 13th IAAF World Championship in Athletics held in Daegau, South Korea from August 27 to September, 2011. She attended South Plains College and Wayland Baptist University in Texas

4.  Harry Lewis

Harry Lewis

Harry Lewis

Harry Sinclair Lewis, better known as Harry Lewis, was born to Edwin J. Lewis and Emma Kermott in Sauk Center, Minnesota, U.S. on February 7, 1885 and died on January 10, 1951 at the age of 65 in Rome, Italy. He was a famous short story writer, novelist, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first American writer to be awarded the Nobel Prize in literature “for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create with wit and humor new types of characters.” He is known for his critical views and capitalism of American society.

5. Kate Elizabeth Winslet

Kate Elizabeth Winslet

Kate Elizabeth Winslet

Kate Elizabeth Winslet, CBE, Commander of the Most Excellent Order, was born on October 5, 1975 at Reading, Berkshire, England. As an actress, she is best known for her performance in Titanic the most famous movie of its time. She played as Rose DeWitt Bukater in it. She has blonde hair and blue eyes. She has won many awards which, not excluding the others, include: the Academy Award for Best Actress for The Reader (2008), Screen Actors Guild, British Academy of Film and Television Arts. She had been nominated twice for an Emmy Award, and received the Honorary Caesar Award for her lifelong acting career.

6. Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe was born in Los Angeles, California, United States on June 1, 1926 and died in Brentwood, Los Angeles, California, U.S. on August 5, 1962. She was a successful actress, model, and singer in the 1950s and 1960s.  In appreciation of her performance in Bus Stop, she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award. She received a David di Donatello award and Golden Globe Award for her performance in Some Like It Hot. The American Film Institute ranked her the sixth Greatest Female Star of All Time in 1999. The same year, the TV Guide network named her number one in Film’s Sexiest Women of All Time.

7. Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13, 1743 at Shadewell, Colony of Virginia, and died on July 4, 1826 at the age of 83 at Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. He was an American Founding Father and the main author of the Declaration of Independence and President of the United States from 1801 to 1809. He was the first United States Secretary serving under George Washington. In 1807, he signed a bill to make a law that banned the importation of slaves into the United States. He oversaw the purchase of the vast Louisiana Territory from France in 1800 and negotiated with his fellow redhead Napoleon Bonaparte in 1803.

8. Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Willem Van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853 at Zundert, Netherlands and died on July 29, 1890 at the age of 37 years at Auyers-sur-Oise, France. He was a Dutch post-impressionist painter known all over the world for his 860 oil paintings and 1300 watercolors. “Starry Night” is considered his best painting by many art critics. His paints were auctioned at exorbitant prices. Van Gogh started painting late in his life, and those produced during his last years of life are considered his best works. He had a history of some mental disturbance and died of a gunshot wound regarded by many as a self-inflicted injury.

9. Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Mark Twain was born to Jane and John Marshall on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, U.S. and died at Redding, Connecticut, U.S. on April, 21, 1910 at the age of 74 years. He was a famous humorist and novelist. He is best known for novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer written in 1876 and its follow up Adventures of Huckleberry Finn published in 1885. Twain earned a lot of money through his writing but lost most of it on account of wrong investments and ultimately had to file bankruptcy. He was helped out by Henry Huttleston Rogers and finally overcame his financial troubles and cleared all the dues of his creditors.

10. Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei was born on February 15, 1564 at Pisa, Duchy of Florence, Italy and died on January 8, 1642 at the age of 77 years at Arcetri, Grand Duchy of Tuscany. He was a famous physicist, mathematician, philosopher and astronomer. He has been variously honored as the father of observational astronomy, father of modern physics, and father of science. Under Pope Urban VIII, he was tried by the Inquisition and found “vehemently suspect of heresy.” Consequently he had to spend the rest of his life under house arrest. It was during this period that he wrote Two New Sciences.

Conclusion:

Red is a hot color, reflective of lively and sometimes fiery elements. Excepting identical twins, people differ in their appearances in respect of stature as well as colors of skin, eyes, and hair. Whatever may be the apparent color, blood is always red and a great binding factor, not only among human beings, but also among the other members of the animal kingdom. Gingers are apparently as different from others as other individuals are from one another. What matters more than red or black hair is the grey matter beneath them.

 

 

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