Famous Knights of the Middle Ages

06/07/12 at 12:12 pm

History tells us about the legendary King Arthur’s bravery and immeasurable courage. Previously, there were many other brave men who combated bloody wars and even won more than King Arthur’s brave men did. However, history failed to record such accurate information for numerous reasons. Some just became myths while some were reported to really exist. King Arthur’s knights were among the world’s best known brave men during the Middle Ages. History kept accurate records on such knights which credited their global fame in the modern world.

Knights, like princes, inherit their power from the noble blood of their parents and become successors after their death. Most members of the knighthood were noble and of the upper class origin though they were mostly seen riding horses. The fact that maintaining a horse for warfare,  which the lower class’s men couldn’t afford, highlights both their power and riches. Their expeditions to become future combatants began as they took their first step out of their cradles. At the youthful age of six or even earlier, male children who were able and had an interest in knighthood were sent to their lords for training and hastening their young combat skills. They were able to learn all the required skills including the how-to’s in handling weapon arts necessary for every knight.  Aside from weaponry, they were also taught important manners such as nobility, courage, and bravery which are necessarily implanted in every aspiring knight’s young mind. Young warriors, which are barely considered as official members of the knighthood, are called squires and culminate their long process of being squires during their manhood in a formal ceremony after the demanding processes of exhaustive trainings and teaching. Their primary duty is to protect their lords and counselors during battles.

1. King Arthur

King Arthur

King Arthur

Perhaps the most famous for his exceptional courage and leadership, he was a British leader who was barely considered as legendary and a product of myth until the evidence spoke for itself in Cornwall for his existence.  Based on Medieval records, he was the leader in the battle against the conquerors from Saxon in Britain during the late 5th century. However, most of his biographical background was appallingly a mixture of legend and fictional invention for Medieval literature. His historical existence was currently disputed by a number of archaeologists and modern historians as to whether he was real or not. The name King Arthur became famous after the writings of Gildas and other various books including the Historia Brittonum.  He also became famous after being known as one of the Knights of the Round Table.

2. Sir Lancelot

Sir Lancelot

Sir Lancelot

He was known for being the successor to  Queen Elaine of Garlot and King Ban. Officially, he was the first proclaimed member of the Knights of the Round Table and was believed to be the mightiest among the other 12. He was a knight with a gentle nature, a perfect example of courage, bravery, and courtesy which was also believed by many to have been bestowed from his parents who enjoyed a perfectly magnificent rule during their leadership. Lancelot was also known for his being able to easily extend his help and serve others even to the ones whom he considered to be neither his mentors nor his lord. Folklore, on the other hand, reported that he was no biological son of the queen but was fostered by Vivien, the Lady of the Lake, after being left by his real parents at a nearby shore. Today, Lancelot stands mightily with his fame being known as one of the world’s supreme historical figures.

3. Sir Gawain

Sir Gawain

Sir Gawain

Rumors and some historical records prove that he was Arthur’s nephew. He was raised  by Morgause and Lot of Orkney and was a child of Anna in Geoffrey of Monmouth before he was fostered by the queen. Soon after the death of his father, he acted as the Orkney clan’s leader, a group which was composed of his half-brother Mordred and the rest of his brothers including Agravian and Gareth. In England, Gawain is misidentified as the chief example of gallantry and courtesy after Lancelot and Percivale. In France, he was known to be the exemplar of diptych fashion after Lancelot for which they considered to be the supreme hero.

4. Sir Geraint

Sir Geraint

Sir Geraint

A Knight of Devon who was born to Dumnonia’s King Erbin and was the eldest. He was at the same time a prince and a successor to the King after the death of his mother who was also the queen during his time. He spent most of his moments in the court of King Arthur for which he considered it to be a place of fun and adventure. Then one time he met the Sparrow Hawk Knight to marry Caer-Teim’s Lady of Enid. He succeeded the throne of Dumnonia and was declared as one of the mighty shipowners of England. He died in a battle with King Arthur during the harsh invasion of the Saxons in the 6th century.

5. Sir Gareth

Sir Gareth

Sir Gareth

He was Sir Gawain’s youngest brother to Queen Morgause and Lot of Orkney. He was best known to be the perfect example of gallantry who was then very loyal to and knighted by Sir Lancelot. He also acted politely with unparalleled chivalry after the abuse of Lynette to him.

6. Sir Gaheris

Sir Gaheris

Sir Gaheris

He was Sir Gareth’s elder brother and a younger brother to Gawain, son of Morgause, Arthur’s sister and Lot of Orkney. He was a squire and received an ample amount of exhaustive training from Gawain before he was officially knighted by Sir Lancelot. He married Lynette, who abused Gareth, who was also marrying Castle Perilous’ Dame Lionesse at the same time of his marriage. Both brothers were murdered by Lancelot accidentally in the middle of their rescue to Guinevere, a queen, when Lancelot never thought them to be one of the knights. Such an accident produced eternal hatred from their brother, Gawaine, who continued his mission shortly after the incident.

7. Sir Bedivere

Sir Bedivere

Sir Bedivere

He was the most loyal knight to King Arthur during his reign and was a faithful follower of the king. He was also among the first knights to link with the brotherhood of the Round Table which was led by King Arthur. He supported Arthur during the battle of St. Michael’s Giant of Mont then was crowned as Duke of Neustria after winning the battle. His terrible condition, having lost one of his hands in the battle, made him an exemplar of courage and bravery.

8. Sir Galahad

Sir Galahad

Sir Galahad

He was the famous biological son of Lancelot though his name was Welsh in origin. He was a son to Elaine, one of Lancelot’s wives, and was taken care of in a nunnery by his great aunt who was at the same time an abbess too during his childhood. He was famous for drawing out the sword of David pinned in a stone at a nearby river for which was believed that only the best knight of the kingdom could draw. After such fame, he was selected to lead the search for the Holy Grail and was never successful for the quest. His bravery during the quest and extraordinary and kingly leadership made him famous today.

9. Sir Kay

Sir Kay

Sir Kay

He was born to Ectorious and was King Arthur’s foster brother. Unlike Lancelot, he was cruel in nature and had mood instability. However, that didn’t exempt him for being one of Arthur’s most faithful followers. He was a Christian though others claimed him to be a Saxon. He was killed during a Roman battle across Mordred. He is likely be compared to a dictator in the modern world though his bravery credits his fame today.

10. Sir Bors de Ganis

Sir Bors de Ganis

Sir Bors de Ganis

He was the only known knight to return to the court during the Quest for the Holy Grail under the leadership of Lancelot’s son, Galahad. He was born to Bors, his father, and succeeded his throne shortly after the quest. He then became the King of Gannes after his father’s death. Later, he married the daughter of King Brandegoris which he magically fell in love with after the princess admitted her love for him. He was a paradigm of humility and was the most innocent knight among the other knights who joined the Round Table.

Reality and rumors tangled up produce legendary stories and a series of unanswered questions whether these knights really existed or not.  However, history proved some of the most known knights, including King Arthur’s, to really exist spending their blood during battles and in harsh conquests for kingdoms. Substantial evidence has been found at Tintagel in Cornwall. Today, these knights are reclaiming their fame and awards of valor. Such knights, listed above, deserve their names be reserved for fame.

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One Response to “Famous Knights of the Middle Ages”

  1. Genesis Mariah

    May 6th, 2013

    Sir Lancelot is real.? ;o thankssss though, this helps a lot!

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